Ingredients:

STRAWBERRY FRUIT FOOL:

1 cup (240 ml) strawberry puree

1 cup (240 ml) heavy whipping cream

1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated white sugar

Strawberry Puree:

1 pound bag (454 grams) frozen unsweetened strawberries

1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons (90 grams) granulated white sugar

KIWI FRUIT FOOL:

1 cup (240 ml) kiwi puree (recipe follows)

1 cup (240 ml) heavy whipping cream

1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated white sugar

Kiwi Puree:

4 kiwis

4-5 tablespoons (48 - 60 grams) granulated white sugar

BLACKBERRY FRUIT FOOL:

1 cup (240 ml) blackberry puree (recipe follows)

1 cup (240 ml) heavy whipping cream

1 1/2 (20 grams) tablespoons granulated white sugar

Blackberry Puree:

1 pound bag (454 grams) frozen unsweetened blackberries

3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated white sugar

RASPBERRY FRUIT FOOL:

3/4 cup (180 ml) raspberry puree (recipe follows)

3/4 cup (180 ml) heavy whipping cream

1 tablespoon (15 grams) granulated white sugar

Raspberry Puree:

12 ounce bag (340 grams) frozen unsweetened raspberries

1/3 cup (65 grams) granulated white sugar, or to taste


Instructions:

Strawberry Fruit Fool: For the Strawberry Puree: Thaw the strawberries (this will take a few hours). Place the strawberries in a food processor, fitted with a steel blade, and process until the berries are pureed. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the sugar. Taste and add more sugar if necessary. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

For Strawberry Fruit Fool: Place mixing bowl and whisk attachment in the refrigerator or freezer for about 15 minutes or until very cold. Whip the cream until soft peaks form. Add the sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form. With a rubber spatula gently fold in the strawberry puree, leaving some streaks of the white whipping cream. Pour the fool into individual long stemmed parfait or wine glasses. Cover and refrigerate until serving time. Can be made about 4 hours before serving. Garnish with a fresh strawberry.

Kiwi Fruit Fool: For the Kiwi Puree: Peel and cut the kiwis into quarters. Place in a food processor, fitted with a steel blade, and process until you have a rough puree. (You should have about one cup of pureed kiwi.) If you end up with less than one cup of pureed kiwi don't worry. Either puree another kiwi so you end up with one cup or simply adjust the amount of whipping cream to equal that of the pureed kiwi. You will notice that you use equal amounts of puree to whipping cream so adjustments are easy to make. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the sugar. Taste and add more sugar if necessary. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

For Kiwi Fruit Fool: Place mixing bowl and whisk attachment in the refrigerator or freezer for about 15 minutes or until very cold. Whip the cream until soft peaks form. Add the sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form. With a rubber spatula gently fold in the kiwi puree, leaving some streaks of the white whipping cream. Pour the fool into individual long stemmed parfait or wine glasses. Cover and refrigerate until serving time. Can be made about 4 hours before serving. Garnish with a slice of kiwi fruit.

Blackberry Fruit Fool: For the Blackberry Puree: In a strainer placed over a large bowl thaw the blackberries (this will take a few hours). Once the berries are thawed, press to remove all the juices so you are left with only the seeds in the strainer. You will have about 1 1/2 cups of pureed blackberries. Stir in the sugar, taste, adding more sugar if necessary. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight. (There will be 1/2 cup of extra puree left over after making the fruit fools. This can be frozen for another use.)

For Blackberry Fruit Fool: Place mixing bowl and whisk attachment in the refrigerator or freezer for about 15 minutes or until very cold. Whip the cream until soft peaks form. Add the sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form. With a rubber spatula gently fold in the blackberry puree, leaving some streaks of the white whipping cream. Pour the fool into individual long stemmed parfait or wine glasses. Cover and refrigerate until serving time. Can be made about 4 hours before serving. Garnish with a few fresh berries.

Raspberry Fruit Fool: For the Raspberry Puree: Thaw the unsweetened frozen raspberries in a large fine meshed strainer suspended over a large bowl. (This may take a few hours.) Once the berries have completely thawed, force the juice from the berries by gently pressing the berries with the back of a large spoon. All that should remain in the strainer is the raspberry seeds. Throw away the raspberry seeds and, to the strained juice, stir in a little lemon juice and the white sugar (add more if needed). Refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

For Raspberry Fruit Fool: Place mixing bowl and whisk attachment in the refrigerator or freezer for about 15 minutes or until very cold. Whip the cream until soft peaks form. Add the sugar and continue to whip until stiff peaks form. With a rubber spatula gently fold in the raspberry puree, leaving some streaks of the white whipping cream. Pour the fool into individual long stemmed parfait or wine glasses. Cover and refrigerate until serving time. Can be made about 4 hours before serving. Garnish with a few fresh berries.

Each English Fruit Fool recipe makes 3-4 servings.


Description:

Dating as far back as the sixteenth century, this classic British dessert has seen its popularity ebb and flow. A Fruit Fool is a delicious mixture of lightly sweetened fruit that has been pureed and then haphazardly folded into whipped cream. I like to use tart fruits such as raspberries, gooseberries, blackberries, kiwi, loganberries, and rhubarb to make Fruit Fools, as they pair so beautifully with the sweet cream.

A Fruit Food is aptly named, since the word "Fool" is believed to have originated from the French word "fouler" which means "to mash" or "to press". And this is exactly what we do with the fruit to make this dessert. A Fruit Fool begins with making a puree from either fresh or frozen fruit. For the kiwi fruit fool, I used fresh kiwi fruit. For the blackberry, raspberry, and strawberry fruit fools, I used frozen unsweetened berries. I like to make the puree the day before it is needed so it has time to thicken and the flavors to blend. Although best when make shortly before serving, you can make the fruit fools several hours in advance of serving. It is best showcased when served in a long stemmed parfait or wine glass, garnished with fresh fruit. A cookie is also a nice accompaniment.

There are a few things to keep in mind when making fruit fools. Anytime you use fresh fruit there is no way to know, without tasting, the exact amount of sugar needed. So tasting is very important here. Make sure you taste the puree and adjust the sugar as needed. The same is true when you mix the puree with the whipped cream. Taste and adjust the sugar and amount of puree as you might want to add a little extra puree if a stronger fruit flavor is desired.