Ingredients:

Recipe:

1/2 cup (125 grams) apricot jam or preserves

1 tablespoon Grand Marnier or water (can also use other liqueurs)

Note: Grand Marnier is an orange liqueur


Instructions:

Heat the apricot jam or preserves and water (if using) in a small saucepan over medium heat until liquid (melted). Remove from heat and strain the jam through a fine strainer to remove any fruit lumps. (If using, add the liqueur at this point.) Let cool until it is only slightly warm and then glaze the fruit or tart crust, using a pastry brush. Note: only lightly coat the fruit or tart shell with the glaze so that it does not look jelly-like when dry.

Variation: If glazing strawberries, raspberries or any other red fruit you can make a red currant glaze. Gently whisk 1/2 cup (125 grams) of red currant jelly over medium heat until melted. Let cool slightly and then lightly glaze the fruit using a pastry brush.

This recipe makes enough to glaze the fruit on a 8 or 9 inch (20 to 23 cm) tart. Preparation time 10 minutes.


Description:

Glaze is defined as a thin, liquid, sweet coating that adds both shine and color to pastries. When brushed on fresh fruit, a glaze serves as a protective coating to prevent the fruit from drying out.

You will also see recipes calling for brushing a glaze on a baked crust before the filling is added. This is done, again, as a protective coating to prevent a soggy pastry crust once the filling has been added and the tart (pie) is baked. The two most popular ingredients for making a glaze for fruit tarts are either an apricot jam (preserve) or else a red currant jelly for red fruits (such as strawberries and raspberries). A pastry brush is normally used to lightly coat the fruit with the glaze.